Wisconsin Federation of Stamp Clubs (WFSC)
Across the Fence Post Newsletter
"The Club Co-op" columns for 1994



          This page includes previous The Club Co-op columns from the WFSC newsletter, Across the Fence Post published in 1994


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January issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

In 1994 we'll pursue a closer relationship with our local post office - a New Year's resolution that could result in many benefits to your club.

Begin by appointing someone to handle post office public relations, and preferably it's someone who can be reached by phone during normal business hours. The first step for that person is to visit your local post office and find the official whose duties might involve serving as a contact for your club. Within the introductory visit, be sure to emphasize that the purpose of the club is to promote stamp collecting within the local community. Offer your club's assistance in areas related to stamp collecting. Give your post office contact written information of your club's meeting location and dates. Include the name and phone number of your new public relations appointee.

Be brief, make unobtrusive follow-up visits, and by all means ensure that your post office contact regularly receives copies of your newsletter.

A Valentine's Day activity

How about a scavenger hunt with a heart for a February meeting activity? This hunt, prepared by Bob Mather, of the Waukesha County Philatelic Society, requires that participants find stamps that in some way relate to each letter of "Happy Valentine's Day." Send me a SASE, and I'll send you a copy of the hunt sheet and rules.

The Waukegan-Ishikawa connection

With the Lake County Philatelic Society (Gurnee/Waukegan, IL area) again a part of the WFSC, I have another great newsletter to add to my list:-Perforations, edited by Howard Shaughnessy.

The November 1993 issue recalls the story of the Waukegan-Ishikawa connection. The story was prompted by the news of Christie's September 1993 auction of Japanese industrialist Ryohei Ishikawa's collection of United States material, which included the celebrated Waukegan cover.

The cover, franked with the 1847 10 issue in a strip of four, was mailed on May 10, 1850, from Waukegan to Canandaigua, NY. Ishikawa purchased the cover from a Raymond Weill auction in 1979, making it famous because of the extraordinary price he paid for it. While in the United States to pick up his winning lot, Ishikawa showed up unannounced at the Waukegan Historical Society in an attempt to gain more information about his new acquisition. Phoebe Booth, a longtime Waukegan librarian and member of the LCPS was on duty at the time. Because of her interest in postal history and knowledge of the cover, she and Ishikawa soon became friends.

In 1983, the LCPS celebrated its 50th anniversary, and to mark their half-century existence, they decided that the 1850 Waukegan cover would make a great cachet for their LACOPEX '83 show covers. In need of a picture of the famous cover, Phoebe wrote to her friend Ishikawa to possibly get a copy of the page where it appeared in the 1979 auction catalog. Ishikawa replied, not with just a photocopy, but with an actual photograph of the cover.

The cover realized $220,000 at Christie's September 1993 auction.

What others are doing

Greater Milwaukee-area clubs are planning their eighth annual Distinguished Philatelist Appreciation Dinner. An advisory committee will review nominations for the guest of honor, who will be announced at the dinner. This year's event is scheduled for Sunday, February 6, and is hosted by the Billy Mitchell Chapter (AAMS).

Milwaukee Philatelic Society 1994 officers are: Pres. William Otto, VP Alice Archie, Treas. John Fagan, Secy. Irene Orz, and Directors Gunther Heller, Wilson Scott and Richard Mansfield.

Wauwatosa Philatelic Society 1994-95 officers are: Pres. Rosemary Jahnke, VP Douglas Van Beek, Secy.-Treas. Walter Jaglowski, and Board Member Charles Koeble.

Here's a way to promote participation. The winner of the Central Wisconsin Stamp Club's (Wisconsin Rapids and Stevens Point) November meeting scavenger hunt received a free year of membership dues.

Members of the Outagamie Philatelic Society (Appleton) toured the Oshkosh Post Office in December. According to the OPS newsletter, the Oshkosh Post Office has the newest mail handling equipment in the state and is second only to Milwaukee in volume of mail processed in Wisconsin post offices.

Last November, the Kenosha Stamp and Cover Club held its annual club auction and wine-tasting event. In addition to a selection of wines sup-plied by the club, members brought some of their own favorites, including a few homemade varieties. Crackers and cheese were available, as well.

Those attending the KSCC's holiday , party were asked to bring a $5 gift to exchange and a nonperishable food item for Kenosha's food pantries.

Some of you may remember the Madison Stamp Club, which disbanded in the mid-1980s. Their dissolution agreement provided that the balance of the treasury is used to purchase philatelic books for the Madison Public Library, and one individual has handled several periodic purchases throughout the years. The Badger Stamp Club (Greater Madison area) matched funds for the last set of books, which now depletes the disbanded club's treasury. Before the books were turned over to the library, however, they were dispersed among BSC members, who are presenting book reviews as a part of BSC meetings.


February issue No column this issue


March issue

By WFSC Secy., Karen Weigt

The fetal position - every club president knows it well, the prevalent posture among the membership when there's a call for volunteers.

While all clubs have those few who absolutely refuse to help out, most members refrain from an immediate response for other reasons. Some feel embarrassed about raising a hand in front of a crowd. Others are unsure of exactly what's involved with the task or position that's on the floor.

A more effective means of recruiting volunteers is to first pinpoint prospects by trying to match tasks with individual personalities and talents. Then approach each prospect on a personal basis with specifics of what the job entails. Be positive about both the task and the individual's ability to perform it well. Counter any negative reactions with a proposal that the individual work with or assist someone else to either lighten the responsibility or gain on-the-job training.

At least three WFSC member clubs encourage volunteers through a stamp bucks program. A specified number of stamp bucks are assigned to each club task and/or mode of service and sup-port. Members then earn and accumulate bucks throughout the year. The Milwaukee Philatelic Society, for example, offers one stamp buck for each meeting attended, two for serving on a committee, 10 for helping with MILCOPEX exhibit setup, etc. MPS - even offers five stamp bucks for promptly paying annual dues.

Once a year, the club holds a special "no cash" auction, whereby all bids are made with stamp bucks and redeemed in lieu of payment for lots.

Other known WFSC clubs that use the stamp bucks system are the Wauwatosa Philatelic Society and Waukesha County Philatelic Society.

What others are doing

With every January comes the Linn's Stamp News annual stamp popularity poll. Four WFSC clubs participated in this year's survey as an adjunct to their planned monthly program or auction: Central Wisconsin Stamp Club (Wisconsin Rapids and Stevens Point), Green Bay Philatelic Society, Northwoods Philatelic Society (Iron Mountain, MI), and Outagamie Philatelic Society (Appleton).

Two members of the Northwoods Philatelic Society (Iron Mountain, MI) recently visited a meeting of the Green Bay Philatelic Society. The visitors described the success of their club's circuit book program, where members enter stamps for sale to others at the meetings. Rather than receiving cash, sellers receive credit that can be used to purchase other stamps from the circuit book. This makes, the activity more of a trading program than a sales program. After hearing of the program's popularity and effectiveness in getting more stamps at meetings, the GBPS decided to give it a try.

Maybe the NPS will try one of the GBPS's favorite activities - a silent auction. Items are placed on tables for members to examine. Bidders write their initials and bid amount on a piece of paper placed next to each item. If a bidder returns to an item to discover that some one else has outbid him, another (and another) bid may be placed in an effort to win the lot. This goes on until the allotted bidding time is up. Winning bidders collect their items and take them to the treasurer for payment. Ten percent of the proceeds go to the GBPS treasury.

The North Shore Philatelic Society of Milwaukee was suddenly informed they could no longer meet at their regular location. Fortunately, within only a month, they were able to find a new location just a few blocks from their old meeting place. They're now at the Whitefish Bay Department of Community Services, 5205 N. Lydell Ave., Whitefish Bay. They continue to meet at 7:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday of the month.

NSPS 1994 officers are: Pres. Morris Luck, VP Michael Uhlarik, Secy. Roberta Bicha and Treas. Robert Mather.

While the Milwaukee Philatelic Society didn't have to change locations, they were forced to switch their usual Saturday meeting night to the third Wednesday of each month. They meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Zablocki Park Pavilion, 3716 W. Howard Ave., Milwaukee. And, if you think your club might being paying a stiff fee for meeting space, consider MPS's $45 per night!

Northwoods Stamp and Coin Club (Rhinelander) 1994 officers are: Pres. Bill Julian, VP Jim Caldwell, Secy. George Jacobs, Treas. Norman Braeger, and Board Member Sheman Muluehill.

Serving the Wisconsin Valley Philatelic Society (Wausau) for 1994 are: Pres. Ed Kott, VP Glen Heinzl, Secy. Wm. Grosnick Sr., and Treas. Fred Ziemann.

By request, the Wauwatosa Philatelic Society recently repeated its 1993 stamp symposium at the Wauwatosa Public Library. The symposium helps youngsters learn the art of stamp collecting.

Those who attended the Belle City Stamp Club (Racine) Christmas party left with a variety of gifts and favors. One lucky member won the drawing for a 1993 set of Scott catalogs. BCSC members look forward to promoting philately at Racine's Downtown Post Office, where remodeling plans include exhibit space for club use.

As of January, the Badger Stamp Club (Greater Madison area) was granted use of an exhibit frame at Madison's Main Post Office. Pages in the 16-page frame will be changed monthly and alternate between youth and adult exhibits.


April issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

It's often described as the glue that holds a club together; it keeps the membership informed and coming to meetings. What's this powerful vehicle? It's a newsletter that does all this, and more.

While the majority of WFSC member clubs produce a monthly or bi-monthly newsletter, there are a few who aren't reaching out with the written word. Perhaps they feel it's too much effort. For those, I suggest trying the simple fill-in-the blank, one-page newsletter shown below. The APS Chapter Activities Committee designed this template in 1989, specifically for local club use.

Note how it includes only the essential elements for keeping your membership informed. When you're ready to expand your newsletter, add other basic items with the space available on the back of the page. Some of our WFSC clubs regularly publish these added items in their newsletters:

president's message

upcoming club or local philatelic events

area shows and bourses

U.S. Postal Service new issues list

member or dealer ads

The Kenosha Stamp and Cover Club and Belle City Stamp Club (Racine) include an advance listing of upcoming auction lots.

Editor Jim Steams - Northwoods Philatelic Society (Iron Mountain, MI) - regularly writes an interesting commentary on major stories appearing in Linn's Stamp News.

The North Shore Philatelic Society of Milwaukee published a series of articles about their club history.

From time to time, the Badger Stamp Club includes book reviews written by various club members.

A few WFSC clubs have more extensive newsletters that feature short original articles. While it's difficult to get members to write, there are many sources for reprinting. A warning though: unless open reprint permission is noted, it's wise to play it safe and obtain such permission by writing directly to the author of the article or editor of the publication. You'll often find them more than willing to comply with your request.

If you start simple, it shouldn't be difficult to find someone to serve as newsletter editor. Today's home computers alleviate much of the editor expertise required in the past. Look for a computer buff among your member-ship. These individuals already have an interest in making use of their equipment.

I've noted that some clubs always assign the title of editor to their president. While it might seem practical to get the word directly from the horse's mouth, your president's plate is already full with leadership responsibilities, and it helps to get others actively involved. This includes the newsletter distribution process. From past editorship experience, I've found that once I've completed the copy, I don't want to deal with getting it reproduced, addressing and stuffing envelopes, and applying postage. Someone else can handle that phase of the operation.

Not only have computers allowed editors to more efficiently produce a newsletter, but also to make them more attractive.

The North Shore Philatelic Society of Milwaukee recently perked up their publication with a photo of Pres. Morris Luck and other eye-catching graphics.

The Northwestern Mutual Stamp Club (Milwaukee) unveiled its new logo, an attractive element that has been added to their newsletter -

As for expense, a newsletter more than pays for itself with member interest and increased meeting attendance. Photocopy costs, like computers, are decreasing. Look for bargains at discount office supply centers and specials at chain photocopy shops. Postage is the biggest expense. Some clubs handle this by having members annually submit a year's supply of SASEs. Or, you can distribute your newsletter to those at the meetings and mail only to the rest.

If you'd like a full-sized copy of the fill-in-the blank template, just send me your request with a SASE.

What others are doing

Our severe weather took its toll, making the predominant winter activity that of canceling meetings and rescheduling programs. Almost all of those I regularly hear from were forced to cancel their January meeting.


May/June issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

It's often described as the glue that holds a club together; it keeps the membership informed and coming to meetings. What's this powerful vehicle? It's a newsletter that does all this, and more.

While the majority of WFSC member clubs produce a monthly or bi-monthly newsletter, there are a few who aren't reaching out with the written word. Perhaps they feel it's too much effort. For those, I suggest trying the simple fill-in-the blank, one-page newsletter shown below. The APS Chapter Activities Committee designed this template in 1989, specifically for local club use.

Note how it includes only the essential elements for keeping your membership informed. When you're ready to expand your newsletter, add other basic items with the space available on the back of the page. Some of our WFSC clubs regularly publish these added items in their newsletters:

president's message

upcoming club or local philatelic events

area shows and bourses

U.S. Postal Service new issues list

member or dealer ads

The Kenosha Stamp and Cover Club and Belle City Stamp Club (Racine) include an advance listing of upcoming auction lots.

Editor Jim Steams - Northwoods Philatelic Society (Iron Mountain, MI) - regularly writes an interesting commentary on major stories appearing in Linn's Stamp News.

The North Shore Philatelic Society of Milwaukee published a series of articles about their club history.

From time to time, the Badger Stamp Club includes book reviews written by various club members.

A few WFSC clubs have more extensive newsletters that feature short original articles. While it's difficult to get members to write, there are many sources for reprinting. A warning though: unless open reprint permission is noted, it's wise to play it safe and obtain such permission by writing directly to the author of the article or editor of the publication. You'll often find them more than willing to comply with your request.

If you start simple, it shouldn't be difficult to find someone to serve as newsletter editor. Today's home computers alleviate much of the editor expertise required in the past. Look for a computer buff among your member-ship. These individuals already have an interest in making use of their equipment.

I've noted that some clubs always assign the title of editor to their president. While it might seem practical to get the word directly from the horse's mouth, your president's plate is already full with leadership responsibilities, and it helps to get others actively involved. This includes the newsletter distribution process. From past editorship experience, I've found that once I've completed the copy, I don't want to deal with getting it reproduced, addressing and stuffing envelopes, and applying postage. Someone else can handle that phase of the operation.

Not only have computers allowed editors to more efficiently produce a newsletter, but also to make them more attractive.

The North Shore Philatelic Society of Milwaukee recently perked up their publication with a photo of Pres. Morris Luck and other eye-catching graphics.

The Northwestern Mutual Stamp Club (Milwaukee) unveiled its new logo, an attractive element that has been added to their newsletter -

As for expense, a newsletter more than pays for itself with member interest and increased meeting attendance. Photocopy costs, like computers, are decreasing. Look for bargains at discount office supply centers and specials at chain photocopy shops. Postage is the biggest expense. Some clubs handle this by having members annually submit a year's supply of SASEs. Or, you can distribute your newsletter to those at the meetings and mail only to the rest.

If you'd like a full-sized copy of the fill-in-the blank template, just send me your request with a SASE.

What others are doing

Our severe weather took its toll, making the predominant winter activity that of canceling meetings and rescheduling programs. Almost all of those I regularly hear from were forced to cancel their January meeting.


July/August issue No column this issue


September issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

There's little doubt that the Legends of the West issue has dominated discussions within the philatelic community for the better part of 1994. While many only postulate on the matter, the Lake County Philatelic Society (Gurnee, IL) decided to take action.

At their July meeting, members of the LCPS signed a letter addressed to PMG Marvin Runyon petitioning the U.S. Postal Service to place on sale all 5.2 million panes of the recalled Leg-ends issue. The petition admonishes the USPS's decision to allow only 150,000 panes to be offered through the Philatelic Fulfillment Service Center during the month of October. It states " . . . the USPS is violating its own rules by creating a philatelic rarity. In the manner in which you are conducting the sales lottery, it is unfair to the average collector; only the major stamp firms will get these sheets."

The saga, as of this date (Aug. 11), is that a legal suit supporting the LCPS's position was lost in federal court. The process of destroying all but 150,000 panes was started, but then mysteriously halted. Watch the philatelic press, and if it isn't too late, you might want to be prepared with your club petition. For a SASE, I'll send you a copy of the LCPS letter to use as a guide.

Howard Shaughnessy, editor of Perforations (the LCPS newsletter), injects his usual humor within a comment about the new Legends sheet: . "Incidentally, there's no truth to the rumor that O.J. Simpson, waving a gun from a white Ford Bronco, will replace the Pickett brothers on the new Legends of the West to be released later this year."

The LCPS isn't totally focused on Legends' matters, though. I noted they've been reading the APS Chapter Activities Committee Newsletter and for their August meeting adopted the idea of a no-money auction described in the April '94 issue. In case you missed it, here's how it works: Each member brings a philatelic "leftover," described as anything saved for some reason, but that no longer fits into your collecting interests. Someone starts by "auctioning" off the item he/ she brought for the activity. The winning "bidder" is the person who, in the opinion of the auctioneer, gives the best reason why he/she deserves this treasure or just can't live without it. A bid can be for any reason, the more creative, the better. That winner then becomes the auctioneer, repeating the process until all items are "sold." Obviously, only those who bring something to auction off are permitted to bid on other members' goodies.

This young-at-heart group also challenged each of its members to complete "Your Stamp Math," the featured youth activity that appeared in the July '94 CACN.

What others are doing

The Green Bay Philatelic Society experienced its third disappointment from the American Topical Association. Last year, they ordered the ATA's space topical slide show for their March meeting. It arrived a week late and had to be immediately returned. They tried again for their March '94 meeting, with the same result. It was reordered for July, with yet another fizzle. The Badger Stamp Club (Greater Madison area) also has been stung by the ATA. The moral of the story: If you've scheduled an ATA slide show for your meeting program, be prepared with a back-up activity.

New officers of the GBPS are: Pres. Kirk Becker, VP Ron Oates, Secy. Clete Delvaux, and Treas. Ken Coakley.

Members of the Kenosha Stamp and Cover Club again participated in the annual "Just Say No" rally held at Carthage College. This year, they distributed more than 800 packets of stamps to the youngsters who attended. Last spring, four members of the North Shore Philatelic Society (Milwaukee) took part in the Cumberland Elementary School's "Student Interest Day." Topics discussed with the youngsters were starting a stamp collection, soaking stamps from envelopes, first-day covers, using catalogs, and how stamps are printed. Each of the 40 students received a package of stamps and other goodies donated by members of the club.

In preparation for TOPEX '94, the Wauwatosa Philatelic Society featured the American Philatelic Society's "Basics of Stamp Exhibiting" slide show at their June meeting.

At their August meeting, members of the Northwoods Stamp and Coin Club (Rhinelander) learned about beer stamps, revenues and gun advertisements.

When looking for a new collecting interest, don't overlook the obvious. A member of the Belle City Stamp Club (Racine) brought his collection of Johnson Wax covers to one of the club's show-and-tell sessions. In case you're new to Wisconsin, Johnson Wax is manufactured in Racine.

Look for the obvious for club meeting programs, too. Officials of the Milwaukee Museum visited the Milwaukee Philatelic Society's April meeting to present a slide program of the history of the William Uihlein stamp collection housed at the museum. Private tours of the actual collection are conducted on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For an appointment, contact museum curators Bernard Weber or John Lundstrom at (414) 278-2702.

The Waukesha County Philatelic Society heard about on-the-job experiences from one of their members who work as a mail carrier.

The Northwoods Philatelic Society (Iron Mountain, MI) has a retired policeman on its roles. He plans to speak about home security and how to keep stamp collections safe and sound.

1994-95 officers of the NPS are: Pres. Milt Wirth, VP Chuck Baldridge, Secy. Jim Stearns, Treas. Ellsworth Semler, and board of trustees George Stolze, Lena Bartels and A1 LeBlanc.


October issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

With summer behind us, stamp club meetings assume a more conventional tone, and many groups are announcing their annual educational program schedules. Here's a chance to peruse some lists for ideas.

From the Badger Stamp Club (Greater Madison area):

Sept. 6 - Deciphering Bar Codes

Oct. 4 - Topical Collecting

Nov. 1 - Fakes, Forgeries and Altered Stamps

Dec. 6 - Wisconsin Brewery Covers/ Beer Stamps

Jan. 3 - Show and Tell

Feb. 7 - State Historical Soc. of Wisc. Philatelic Holdings

Mar. 7 - WFSC Trivia Contest Apr. 4 - APS Slide Show "Number Ones of the World"

May 2- Dumb Question Night

June 6 - APS Slide Show "Basics of Stamp Exhibiting "

BSC also provided a National Stamp Collecting Month promotional display for the Middleton Public Library.

1994-95 BSC officers are: Pres. Peter Smith, VP Art Arntsen, Secy. Kay Stefani, Treas. Ed O'Brien, and board members Dan Undersander, George Cook, John Rettig and Ron Hayes.

From the Belle City Stamp Club (Racine), which usually includes a related exhibit show and tell as shown in the September example:

Sept. 1 - (Exhibit) Boy Scouts Topical (Program) Life of Baden-Powell

Nov. 3 Perfins

Jan. 5 - "The Airmail Story" Video

Mar. 2 - John F. Kennedy

Apr. 6 - "Timbromania" Film

June 1 - Wheeler-Dealer Night

Auctions and a Christmas party scheduled for months not listed.

From the Outagamie Philatelic Society (Appleton):

Sept. 15- Philatelic Swap 'n' Shop/ National Postal Museum

Nov. 17 - Linn's Scavenger Hunt

Dec. 15 - Stamp Bingo and Christmas Pot Luck

Jan. 19 - APS Slide Show

Feb. 16 - WFSC Trivia Contest

Apr. 20- APS Slide Show

Months not listed feature auctions and social events.

The North Shore Philatelic Society (Milwaukee) meetings include a round-table discussion on subjects related to philately. Choose a debatable topic, and this could be an full night's educational program on its own.

For a twist on show and tells, try the Waukesha County Philatelic Society's Alphabet Fun. Last January, they asked members to bring a philatelic item beginning with the letter "F." Could it be that "G" is scheduled for their next show and tell session?


November issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

Of our 32 WFSC member clubs, 12 sponsor an annual show with exhibits. Besides MILCOPEX, which draws exhibits from throughout the United States, most of these clubs depend on their members to provide a constant turnover of fresh material. Consequently, these clubs are continually searching for a means to encourage their members to become involved in exhibiting.

American Philatelic Society chapter clubs have access to the APS's slide show "Basics of Stamp Exhibiting."

DANEPEX, sponsored by the Badger Stamp Club (Greater Madison area), keeps its exhibitors enthusiastic by providing a judges' critique.

The Milwaukee Philatelic Society's September meeting program focused on how to create a single-frame exhibit. The Wisconsin Valley Philatelic Society (Wausau), successfully interested its members in exhibiting by devoting their entire 1994 exhibition to single-frame exhibits. And, WISCOPEX '95 plans to dedicate a portion of its frames to this ever-growing approach to exhibiting. A single-frame exhibit (usually 16 pages) appeals to new exhibitors, who find it overwhelming to commit to preparing a larger exhibit. If judged as a separate category, it also tends to remove the intimidation of having to compete with seasoned multi-frame exhibits.

To start smaller yet, try the method of encouragement used by the Rochester Philatelic Association (Rochester, NY). At every monthly meeting, this group features a one-page exhibition contest. Members prepare a display on the predetermined topic for the month (e.g., flowers, horses, trains), and a vote is held to determine the best entry. The winner receives five points, second place earns four points, third is three points, fourth gets two points, and all entries receive one point. Ties split points for their placing. Entrants accumulate points for a one-year period of time, and the member with the highest point total receives a free ticket for the club's annual banquet.

Last spring, the Champaign-Urbana Stamp Club (Champaign, IL) decided to allocate two frames for an "informational philatelic material" display at their annual show. To fill the frames, the club challenged each of their members to prepare a single page to illustrate some philatelic point, term, or general tidbit of information. As I recall, the Outagamie Philatelic Society (Appleton) did something similar a few years ago, and the exhibit is popular with visitors to their annual show.

While youth generally are less inhibited about preparing an exhibit, they do find it frustrating when it comes to the costs and means of attaining exhibit supplies. The Badger Stamp Club handles that problem by providing mounts, page protectors, etc., for all its youth exhibitors. The club also sponsors an annual youth exhibiting workshop, where the youngsters receive one-on-one adult assistance and advice on the mechanics of exhibiting. It doesn't end there, though. The adult helpers follow up on the progress of the youths' exhibits, sometimes even by putting out a call to other BSC members for particular philatelic items needed by the young exhibitors.

Now, go for it, and may your exhibit frames forever be filled!

What others are doing

The Waukesha County Philatelic Society sometimes plans its programs around major current events. In connection with the 1994 Winter Olympics, the club's February meeting featured a stamp Olympics. Members received a short description of 10 different United States Winter Olympics stamps. They were asked to locate the Scott catalog number and postal rate or value assigned to each of the stamps. If you'd like to try this Olympic event at one of your club meetings, ~ just send me a SASE with your request for the stamp descriptions and rules of the game.

At their September meeting, members of the Central Wisconsin Stamp Club (Wisconsin Rapids and Stevens Point) were introduced to phone cards that depict stamps. They also discussed plans to participate in the Wisconsin Rapids Youth Activity Day scheduled for next April. Newly elected officers are: VP George Blauvelt and Secy. Gregg Greenwald. Both will serve for the Wisconsin Rapids/Port Edwards group.

The Northwoods Philatelic Society (Iron Mountain, MI) held a Fall Harvest Dinner as part of its September meeting. They also recently voted to apply for APS chapter membership and are thinking of sponsoring a stamp show.

The Lake County Philatelic Society's (Gurnee, IL) September meeting featured the APS slide show "Around the World in Eighty Stamps." ~ Their Fall Auction will be held November 6 at the Warren-Newport Library.

It was Christmas in September for the Northwestern Mutual Stamp Club (Milwaukee). Members showed Christmas philatelic items and participated in a special Christmas quiz. The NMSC's November meeting has been reserved for their annual Bingo Nite.

Members of the Wisconsin Valley Philatelic Society were delighted to learn that two Wausau schools want to start a stamp-collecting program for youngsters in the 4th and 5th grades. The WVPS voted to help with the project, which will be part of Wausau's Continuing Education program.

The Kenosha Stamp and Cover Club now holds a club bourse at each of its meetings. Members may purchase items from the club's recent acquisition of United States and worldwide stamps and postal history covers. The club will use the income to buy more large lots as needed.


December issue

By WFSC Secy. Karen Weigt

Three years ago, the Badger Stamp Club (Greater Madison area) re-served the Middleton Public Library's display case for October '94. It was a long wait, as it is in most metropolitan areas for use of public facilities, and the club eagerly took advantage of its rare opportunity.

The display case used was 11 feet long, 6 feet high and 18 inches deep. Small easels were used to prop up three six-page exhibit frames. But, a picture is worth a thousand words, so just take a look at the illustration below for all the details. Perhaps it will give your club some ideas for a stamp collecting display.

The Sheboygan Stamp Club reports that they also prepared an October National Stamp Collecting Month display this year. The SSC filled the Sheboygan Post Office display case, which is located in the middle of the only entrance, where everyone has to pass within 5 feet to 10 feet of it.

The display focused on stamp collecting tools: tongs, magnifying glass, hinges, stock sheets, Hawid mounts, stamp identifier, glassine envelopes, perforation gauge, and color guide.

It also featured catalogs and literature: Scott catalog, Harris Postage Stamp Catalog, The Postal Service Guide to U.S. Stamps, "An Introduction to Stamp Collecting," by Steven Rod, Linn's Stamp News, and Global Stamp News.

The SSC added a large, clear envelope of off-paper used stamps, a large poster with the words "October is National Stamp Collecting Month," and a smaller poster describing club activities and meeting information.

What others are doing

October was a busy month for the Sheboygan Stamp Club. For their fall kickoff, they sent invitations to all members who did not attend the previous meeting. The kickoff included a business meeting and auction, followed by ham sandwiches, smoked salmon, chips, soda and beer.

Later that month, the club participated in the Sheboygan Postal Service Consumer Appreciation Day. Staffers at the SSC table distributed copies of Linn's Stamp News, information about their club, and unfranked cachet covers from their past local shows. Youths, parents and grandparents received a packet of stamps.

The North Shore Philatelic Society (Milwaukee) reports that its annual auction, held in October, was a great success. They're looking forward to repeating it again next year. The NSPS Christmas party will include a potluck dinner, voluntary gift exchange, and election of officers.

Several clubs are planning a holiday social. The Wauwatosa Philatelic Society's Christmas party will include a dinner, 10 door prizes, and bingo with cash prizes.

With proceeds from Stamp Show '94, the Kenosha Stamp and Cover Club paid for a portion of the meal tab for each member attending their holiday party.

Wisconsin Valley Philatelic Society (Wausau) 1995 officers are: Pres. Glen Heinz!, VP Dave Suelzer, Secy. Wm. Grosnick Sr. and Treas. Fred Ziemann.

The Milwaukee Philatelic Society's October meeting featured the APS slide show "Plate Number Coils." MPS 1995 officers are: Pres. Alice Archie, VP Arthur Petri, Secy. Irene Orz, Treas. John Fagan, and directors Ray Orz and Roger Szymanski.

All Milwaukee-area clubs are gearing up for the ninth annual Distinguished Philatelist Appreciation Dinner, scheduled for Sunday, March 5. The identity of the guest of honor will be held secret until that time. Could someone from the Milwaukee area drop me a note to clarify exactly which club is serving as official host of the '95 event?



Latest update: June 12, 2005 

URL:   http://www.WFSCstamps.org/wfsc_atfp_co-op_1994.shtml